What’s The Best Fixed Gear Or A Single-Speed Bike

A fixed or single-speed transmission requires you to try hard to go uphill and in the latter case also to descend quickly the fixed gear does not allow free riding.
A fixed or single-speed transmission requires you to try hard to go uphill and in the latter case also to descend quickly the fixed gear does not allow free riding.

Single-speed cycling is cycling in its simplest form. Because they don’t have a lot of gears, single-speed bikes are low-maintenance, making them perfect for everyday use. But aside from minimal maintenance costs, why build one?

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A fixed or single-speed transmission requires you to work harder uphill and in the latter case also to descend quickly the fixed gear does not allow free riding. Their benefit or lack is hotly debated, but it can be said that they can make you a stronger racer and you will certainly learn new techniques.

On flatter ground, their reduced weight (compared to an equivalent track bike) and their ruggedness make single-speed bikes the ideal partner for commuting. There’s no need to think about shifting gears, they’re also fun to drive, while many riders are drawn to the minimalist aesthetic.

Single speed bikes have fewer parts than standard bikes, so sometimes you can buy more bikes for less money. However, despite their simplicity, there are plenty of options that cater to many different niches.

What is a single-speed bike?

Close-up of the rear hub of a single-speed bike
Speed -500 With Fixwed Dropouts

As the name suggests, single speed bikes have only one gear. The single speed bikes available often use a simple BMX-style freewheel mechanism that bolts to the rear axle. It is also possible to convert most single speed bikes using aftermarket parts.

Single-speed bikes offer many of the same benefits as stationary bikes, but the cycling experience is more traditional (and therefore more beginner-friendly).

What is a fixie?

Chainset of Matthew Loveridge's On-One Pompino fixie
Matthew Loveridge

The Fixie, also known as a fixed gear bike or a fixed wheel bike, is the simplest type of bicycle available, without any freewheel mechanism. Technically, a stationary bike is also a single speed bike, but the lack of freewheeling means that if the bike is in motion, your legs have to turn and you can control your speed without the need for a freewheel. touch the brake.

Bicycles used on the track (i.e. on the track) always have a fixed number, but this style of bike is also very popular for commuting and urban commuting, and there are many options on the road. market for city-friendly stationary vehicles.

The process of learning to ride a horse is fixed because you have to train your brain to never stop pedaling. Many cyclists enjoy the experience and feeling of being directly connected to the road. Laws vary by country, but in the UK, a fixie needs only one brake (front) as the direct connection to the rear wheel counts as your second brake.

There is a fixed fad of riding without brakes, but we strongly recommend against doing that because – beyond the legal implications – physics dictates that you can’t stop that fast without front brakes .

Should I buy a fixie? (Or a single-speed?)

Correct! Practical benefits aside, the repair in particular is interesting. Riding the fixed version adds a new dimension to cycling and we recommend everyone to give it a try. Even if the pure stationary bike isn’t for you, the single speed bike has a lot to offer.

We don’t necessarily have to choose a stationary or a single piece of gear for all of our travel – we also love road bikes, gravel bikes and any other type of bike – but for moving around town on a daily basis they are highly recommended.